Marking Barrio Balete as a ‘Nihon-machi’ at San Marcelino Church, Manila

Manila Mayor Lito Atienza inaugurated the Balete Marker at the side of the San Marcelino Church on April 25, 2002
Manila Mayor Lito Atienza (r. 1998-2007) inaugurated the Balete Memorial at the side of the San Marcelino Church on April 25, 2002 — with Fr. Toru Nishimoto, CSsR, first Japanese Redemptorist missionary — who was assigned to Manila for 35 years.

►As Japanese pilgrims – visiting a Philippines to which their Japanese forebears had been deported four centuries ago – discovered there were many places in Manila associated with the Japanese Christian exiles who left Japan in 1614, they wanted permanent markers so future generations will know – before the fast pace of infrastructure development erases them from the map.

The best places for markers are in the grounds of Catholic churches associated with the Japanese Christians. The first such marker was installed at the San Marcelino Church (St. Vincent de Paul Church), on San Marcelino St., Manila

Text on the Plaque Was Both in English and Japanese

The ‘Balete Marker’ reads: “FIRST JAPANESE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY – The barrio of Balete, along the Estero de Balete, was officially designated as a ‘Japantown’ in 1601 to accommodate hundreds of Japanese who had been settled in Dilao town since 1592.” [We do not know where 1601 came from.]

The marker was commissioned by Ryohei Fujimoto, a staunch Catholic from Kyoto who funded several scholarships for Filipino students – under the Pre-Evangelization Program (PEP) of Fr. Toru Albert Nishimoto, CSsR (1933 – Aug. 21, 2010), the first Japanese priest to join the Redemptorists.

The Cross is an exact copy of a Christian marker in Kyoto.

Manila Mayor Jose “Lito” Atienza (r. 1998-2007) inaugurated this Balete Memorial on April 25, 2002. ◘

By Dr. Ernie A. de Pedro
Managing Trustee
Lord Takayama Jubilee Foundation

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