Were the Jesuits Ever Expelled from the Philippines?

Yes, in 1768. The Jesuits were able to return to Manila only in 1859.

► In 1759, Portugal issued a Royal Edict banning the Jesuits. This had a domino effect of Jesuits being exiled from various European countries — France (1764), MaltaParma, Sicily, the Spanish Empire (1767) and Austria and Hungary (1782). Of course, their foreign colonies were affected too. The historian Ida Altman writes: “Monarchies attempting to centralize and secularize political power viewed the Jesuits as being too international, too strongly allied to the papacy, and too autonomous from the monarchs in whose territory they operated.”

In 1768, the Philippines implemented the Edict, completing the deportations by 1771.

Still later — on July 21, 1773 — Pope Clement XIV published the Papal Brief (“Dominus ac Redemptor”) for the Suppression of the Jesuit Society. At that time there were 22,589 Jesuits, 49 Provinces, 669 Colleges and over 3,000 missionaries worldwide.

Did any Jesuit defy the deportation orders from the Philippines – as they had defied the deportation orders of the Tokogawa Shogunate, by going underground?  (No, that was simply unheard of. This was the Pope issuing a Papal Brief!) Alone among all religious orders in the Catholic Church, the Jesuits – as the Pope’s militia — owed special fealty and obedience to papal authority.

After their restoration by Pope Pius VII in 1814, the Jesuits returned to most of the places from which they had been expelled. In the Philippines, it took another 45 years to effect the return — in 1859. ◘

One thought on “Were the Jesuits Ever Expelled from the Philippines?

  1. Why were the Jesuits expelled, Doc Ernie?

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    On Fri, Sep 1, 2017 at 9:10 AM, Blessed Justo Takayama Ukon wrote:

    > ernestodepedro posted: ” Yes, in 1768. The Jesuits were able to return to > Manila only in 1859. ► In 1759, Portugal issued a Royal Edict banning the > Jesuits. This had a domino effect of Jesuits being exiled from various > European countries — France (1764), Malta, Parma, Sicily,” >

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